Food for Agile Thought #229: Traumatic Agile, Measuring Transformations, Experiments at Pinterest, Absurd Design Sprints

TL; DR: Traumatic Agile, Absurd Design Sprints—Food for Agile Thought #229

Welcome to the 229th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 25,103 peers. This week, we ask whether ‘Agile’ is a reactionary movement; we delve into suitable metrics for experiments, and we learn from a bank how to become agile with 20-plus teams.

We also learn how Pinterest keeps ideas for experiments coming. Speaking of which, we gain insight into suitable experiments at Slack, and we reconsider the usefulness of Design Sprints.

Lastly, we finally have a reference to answer the obvious question: Does Google use Scrum?

Did you miss last week’s Food for Agile Thought’s issue #228?

Food for Agile Thought #229: Traumatic Agile, Measuring Transformations, Experiments at Pinterest, Absurd Design Sprints — Age-of-Product.com

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Agile Movers & Shakers (4): Dave West, CEO of Scrum.org

TL; DR: The Agile Movers & Shakers Interview with Dave West of Scrum.org

Welcome to the Agile Movers & Shakers interview series. Today’s guest is Dave West.

Dave West is the Product Owner and CEO at Scrum.org. He is a frequent keynote speaker and is a widely published author of articles, along with his acclaimed book: Head First Object-Oriented Analysis and Design. He led the development of the Rational Unified Process (RUP) and then worked with Ivar Jacobson running the North American business for IJI. Then Dave managed the software delivery practice at Forrester research where he was VP and research director. Prior to joining Scrum.org, Dave West was Chief Product Officer at Tasktop where he was responsible for product management, engineering, and architecture.

Agile Movers & Shakers (4): Dave West — CEO and Product Owner of Scrum.org — Age-of-Product.com

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Food for Agile Thought #228: Asking Good Questions, Product Catastrophes, Agile’s Cognitive Science, Trade-offs & Debts

TL; DR: Asking Good Questions, Trade-offs & Debts—Food for Agile Thought #228

Welcome to the 228th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 25,103 peers. This week, we delve into asking good questions, thus overcoming assumptions; we learn more about the cognitive science behind ‘Agile,’ and we cautiously check SAFe again.

We gain insight into how to handle product failures catastrophes; we reflect whether trade-offs are worth the costs. Also, we come back to defining what a product is, focusing on its two critical elements.

Lastly, we appreciate an excursion into psychological safety—from its origins to pioneering its application.

Did you miss last week’s Food for Agile Thought’s issue #226?

Food for Agile Thought #228: Asking Good Questions, Agile’s Cognitive Science, Product Catastrophes, Trade-offs & Debts

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Product Owner Anti-Patterns — 31+2 Ways to Improve as a PO

TL; DR: Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns

If you are working as a Product Owner, there is—very likely—room for improvement. This list of some of the most common Product Owner anti-patterns might be a starting point. Hence, if you recognize some anti-patterns in your daily work, why don’t you ask the rest of the Scrum Team for support? The Product Owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a retrospective.

Product Owner Anti-Patterns — 31 Ways to Improve as a PO by Age of Product

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Food for Agile Thought #227: Agile Core Beliefs, Psychology of Feature Adoption, Agile Coaching Competencies, Design’s Unsexy Middle Bits

TL; DR: Agile Core Beliefs, Psychology of Feature Adoption—Food for Agile Thought #227

Welcome to the 227th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 25,021 peers. This week, we address agile core beliefs; we embrace the idea of a one-day Sprint, and we come back to agile coaching competencies.

We also learn how to move on as a product team, struggling with becoming data-informed; we explore cognitive biases in the adoption progress of new features, and we figure out how to speed up A/b tests without sacrificing accuracy.

Lastly, we appreciate the notion that we are not all designers—despite stickies, sharpie, and prototyping apps.

Did you miss last week’s Food for Agile Thought’s issue #226?

Food for Agile Thought #227: Agile Core Beliefs, Psychology of Feature Adoption, Agile Coaching Competencies, Design’s Unsexy Middle Bits — Age-of-Product.com

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Scrum: 20 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns

TL; DR: 20 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns

Sprint Planning is a core event, defining how your customers’ lives will improve with the next Product Increment. Learn more on how to improve its effectiveness by avoiding 20 common Sprint Planning anti-patterns.

20 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns — Berlin Product People GmbH

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