Food for Agile Thought #118: Scrum Troubles, Brilliant Jerks, How to Experiment, Sprint Review for POs

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #118—shared with 12,812 peers—addresses the not so apparent Scrum troubles: it is hard, expensive and utterly useless if implemented half-heartedly.

Jeff Patton explains a range of human flaws and failures during product discovery, which is the reason that AirBnB runs experiments diligently—learn from Jan how that works in detail.

Lastly, we cover once more the issue of brilliant engineers who also happen to be jerks, and the pointy-haired Boss finally reveals the purpose of predictions.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #118: Scrum Troubles, Brilliant Jerks, How to Experiment, Sprint Review for POs

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Create Personas with the Help of the Engineers

TL; DR: Create Personas with the Help of the Engineers

Creating valuable software requires knowing the customer—we all agree on that, right? The first question that then comes to mind is how to support this product discovery process in a meaningful manner in an agile environment? And the second question follows swiftly: who shall participate in the process—designers and business analysts or the engineers, too?

Read on and learn why personas are useful for product discovery purposes, how to create personas, and why the complete team—including the engineers—needs to participate in their creation.

Create Personas with the Help of the Engineers — Age of Product

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Food for Agile Thought #117: The Agile Periodic Table, Scrum Guide 2017, AMA W/ Steve Portigal

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #117—shared with 12,693 peers—covers the agile periodic table, a remarkable visualization of agile principles and practices. We also learn more about the background of the changes to the Scrum Guide leading to the 2017 edition.

In addition to that, we feature survey results that prove that being able to prioritize product features is the most important trait that defines your success as a product owner or product manager.

Lastly, the WhatUsersDo Community on Slack had a great session with tips & tricks from Steve Portigal on user testing. (By the way, the Hands-on Agile Slack community just crossed the 2000 member threshold, see below.)

Have a great week!

The Agile Periodic Table, Scrum Guide 2017, AMA W/ Steve Portigal — Food for Agile Thought #117
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The Overall Retrospective for Team and Stakeholders

TL;DR: The Overall Retrospective

After rebuilding an existing application on a new tech stack within time and under budget our team had an overall retrospective with stakeholders this week to identify systemic issues. We found more than 20 problems in total and derived eight detailed recommendation the organization will need to address when moving forward to the next level of agile product creation.

Read on and learn how we achieved this result in under two hours with an overall retrospective attended by 16 people.

Age of Product: The Overall Retrospective for Team and Stakeholders

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Food for Agile Thought #116: Agile Experiments, Starting Standups on Time, Rebuilding Trust

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #116—shared with 12,576 peers—covers agile experiments, and how to free yourself from five failure anxieties when transitioning to agile.

We also learn how to motivate people to be on time (without playing Bob Marley), and how to rebuild trust in a product and engineering team.

Lastly, we learn from Julian Birkinshaw—Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at the London Business School—about Agile’s impact on strategy.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #116: Agile Experiments, Starting Standups on Time, Rebuilding Trust

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Food for Agile Thought #115: Agile ROI, Winning Hearts and Minds, Product Transparency

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #115—shared with 12,439 peers—focuses on winning hearts and minds in the organization as we borrow from political campaigns, and we now can convince financially-minded business people about the Agile ROI.

We also go the extra mile providing transparency on the product process, we learn how to translate prioritization into numbers every MBA understands, and we kiss ‘one-size-fits-all’ Agile good-bye.

Lastly, John Cutler asks the right question: Shall the product organization focus on learning fast or shipping fast?

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #115: Agile ROI, Winning Hearts and Minds, Product Transparency

Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #115: Agile ROI, Winning Hearts and Minds, Product Transparency