Food for Agile Thought #129: Mental Models, Resilience, Roadmap Questions, Combining Kanban and XP

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #129—shared with 14,709 peers—covers mental models relevant to your agile journey and shares the download link to an excellent book on team-centric agile software development. (Yub, it is free of charge.)

We then dive into organizational resilience through business agility, what your stakeholders want to know regarding your product roadmap, and why loving your customers’ problems will make your life so much easier.

Lastly, Intercom’s VP of Product created an overview what product people with an agile mindset can expect from the organization. (And the good folks at Intercom are checking a lot of the right boxes!)

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #129: Mental Models, Resilience, Roadmap Questions, Combining Kanban and XP

Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #129: Mental Models, Resilience, Roadmap Questions, Combining Kanban and XP

Use Burn-Down Charts to Discover Scrum Anti-Patterns

TL;DR: Use Burn-Down Charts to Discover Scrum Anti-Patterns

A burn-down chart tracks the progress of a team toward a goal by visualizing the remaining work in comparison to the available time. So far, so good. More interesting than reporting a status, however, is the fact that burn-down charts also visualize scrum anti-patterns of a team or its organization.

Learn more about discovering these anti-patterns that can range from systemic issues like queues outside a team’s sphere of influence and other organizational debt to a team’s fluency in agile practices.

Use Burn-Down Charts to Discover Scrum Anti-Patterns: Ideal Case

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Food for Agile Thought #128: Disrupting Companies, Scrum@Scale Guide, Information Radiators

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #128—shared with 14,506 peers—covers disrupting companies—seven habits that make any organization highly vulnerable—, Jeff Sutherland’s new framework to scale scrum, and the movements that inspire the future of work.

We then dive into the advantages of autonomous product teams and learn that a bug-free product is not necessarily a sign of a quality mindset.

Lastly, if your stakeholders believe your team is a black box, why not build an information radiator? C. Kyle Jacobsen can help you with that.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #128: Disrupting Companies, Scrum@Scale Guide, Information Radiators

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Food for Agile Thought #127: Useless Agile Metrics, CD Works, Product Experiments, Fewer Product Managers

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #127—shared with 14,292 peers—covers useless agile metric; we learn common excuses why continuous delivery would not work, and how to organize a big room planning.

We then talk about signs of a toxic team culture, how design thinking, agile and lean fit together, and what to do when a team fails to deliver at the end of a sprint.

Lastly, we learn why experiments do not just happen to the best organizations but perhaps create them, and what product thinking has to do with it.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #127: Useless Agile Metrics, CD Works, Product Experiments, Fewer Product Managers

Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #127: Useless Agile Metrics, CD Works, Product Experiments, Fewer Product Managers

13 Signs of a Toxic Team Culture

TL; DR: 13 Signs of a Toxic Team Culture

What looked like a good idea back in the 1990ies—outsourcing, for example, software development as a non-essential business area—has meanwhile massively backfired for a lot of legacy organizations. And yet, they still do not understand what it takes to build a decent product/engineering culture. Learn more about typical anti-patterns and are signs that the organization has a toxic team culture.

13 Signs of a Toxic Team Culture — Age of Product

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Food for Agile Thought #126: Agile Engineering, Swarming, Experimentation Culture, Metrics Fetish

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #126—shared with 14,145 peers—covers the state of agile engineering in 2018, why creating and nurturing a groundswell of enthusiasm is essential for an agile transition, and what organizations need to focus on in search of (agile) excellence.

We then learn how any product-oriented organization can create a culture of experimentation and why the velocity of experimentation is probably not a vanity metric. Apropos metrics: there is a new list with anti-patterns available.

Lastly, McKinsey seems to get serious about ‘agile.’ Check out the trademarks McKinsey identified in all agile organizations and let me know your opinion in the comments.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #126: Agile Engineering, Swarming, Experimentation Culture, Metrics Fetish

Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #126: Agile Engineering, Swarming, Experimentation Culture, Metrics Fetish