36 Scrum Stakeholder Anti-Patterns

TL; DR: Scrum Stakeholder Anti-Patterns

Learn how individual incentives and outdated organizational structures — fostering personal agendas and local optimization efforts — manifest themselves in Scrum stakeholder anti-patterns that easily impede any agile transformation to a product-led organization.

36 Scrum Stakeholder Anti-Patterns — Scrum Anti-Patterns 2022 — Age-of-Product.com
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Product Owner Anti-Patterns — 33 Ways to Improve as a PO

TL; DR: Scrum Master Anti-Patterns

No other role in Scrum can contribute to mediocre outcomes like the Product Owner—garbage in, garbage out. Therefore, the following list of some of the most common Product Owner anti-patterns might be a starting point to reflect on the role; maybe, there is room for improvement?

If you recognize some anti-patterns in your daily work, why don’t you ask the rest of the Scrum Team for support? For example, run a Retrospective with teammates and stakeholders on how the team is doing regarding figuring out what is worth building.

Product Owner Anti-Patterns — 32 Ways to Improve as a PO — The Scrum Anti-Patterns Guide — Age-of-Product.com
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28+2 Sprint Anti-Patterns Holding Back Scrum Teams

TL; DR: 28+2 Sprint Anti-Patterns from Sprint Stuffing to Gold-Plating

Welcome to the Sprint anti-patterns article from my series on Scrum anti-patterns, covering the three Scrum roles—pardon me: accountabilities—and addressing the contributions of stakeholders and the IT/line management. Moreover, I add some food for thought. For example, could a month-long Sprint be too short for accomplishing something meaningful? And if so, what are the consequences?

28+2 Sprint Anti-Patterns Holding Back Scrum Teams — Age-of-Product.com
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How to Sabotage A Product Owner — 53 Anti-Patterns from the Trenches

TL; DR: How to Sabotage A Product Owner — 53 Anti-Patterns from the Trenches to Avoid

One of my favorite exercises from my Professional Scrum Product Owner classes is how to best sabotage a Product Owner as a member of the middle management. The exercise rules are simple: You’re not allowed to use any form of illegal activity. So, outsourcing the task to a bunch of outlaws is out of the question. Instead, you are only allowed to use practices that are culturally acceptable within your organization.

Read on and learn more on how to best sabotage a Product Owner from the exercise results of more than twenty PSPO classes. (I edited the suggestions for better readability.)

How to Sabotage A Product Owner — 53 Anti-Patterns from the Trenches — Age-of-Product.com
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The Lack of Agile Leadership Qualities — Making Your Scrum Work #15

TL; DR: The Lack of Agile Leadership Qualities — When Change Agents Don’t Act as Role Models

There are plenty of failure possibilities with Scrum. Given that Scrum is a framework with a reasonable yet short “manual,” this effect should not surprise anyone. When Scrum becomes an element of an agile transformation, a lack of agile leadership qualities on the incumbents’ side may impede its overall progress significantly despite the best efforts of all other change agents.

📺 Join me and explore the consequences of a lack of agile leadership qualities and what you can do about it in less than three minutes.

The Lack of Agile Leadership Qualities — Making Your Scrum Work #15 — Age-of-Product.com

Update: Join the LinkedIn Poll: What leadership behavior have you noticed in the past that is impeding an agile transformation?

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The Developers Code Fallacy — Making Your Scrum Work #9

TL; DR: The Developers Code Fallacy — They Should Talk to Customers, Too, Though

There are plenty of failure possibilities with Scrum. Given that Scrum is a framework with a reasonable yet short “manual,” this effect should not surprise anyone. The Developers Code Fallacy starts with the idea that Developers are rare and expensive and should focus on creating code. Business analysts or customer care agents can talk to customers instead. However, in practice, it has a diminishing effect on a Scrum team’s productivity and creativity. It is a sign for an organization still profoundly stuck in industrial paradigm thinking.

Join me and explore the reasons and the consequences of this Scrum anti-pattern in 110 seconds.

The Developers Code Fallacy — Making Your Scrum Work #9 — Age-of-Product.com
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