Food for Agile Thought #164: Servant Leaders, Scaling Agile and Product Organizations, Minimum Lovable Products

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #164—shared with 19,635 peers—focuses on successful behavioral patterns of servant leaders, the reasons why change at an organizational level is so hard, and how to cherry-pick existing agile scaling frameworks from SAFe® to Nexus and LeSS.

We also learn from Trello’s example how to scale a product organization, what path Buffer chose to create their new minimum lovable analytics tool, and that distributed teams do not stand in the way of building excellent products.

Lastly, we follow Dave West when he outlines the five most pressing challenges of agile transformations and how to deal with them.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #164: Servant Leaders, Scaling Agile and Product Organizations, Minimum Lovable Products

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Webinar #8: Scrum Master Anti-Patterns

TL;DR: Webinar Scrum Master Anti-Patterns

The eighth Hands-on Agile webinar Scrum Master Anti-Patterns addresses twelve anti-patterns of your Scrum Master—from ill-suited personal traits and the pursuit of individual agendas to frustration with the team itself.

Webinar Scrum Master Anti-Patterns Hands-on-Agile Webinar #8

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Food for Agile Thought #163: Building Agile Teams, Curiosity and Discovery, Squandering Brilliant Ideas

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #163—shared with 19,504 peers—focuses on building agile teams. We learn that a group of folks being in the same place at the same time does not constitute a team, that throwing money at the challenge cannot buy success. It seems, though, that successful team coaching is a long and windy road.

We also come back to another favorite topic—how to avoid building the wrong product—and understand that continuous product discovery based on hypotheses and experiments is essential for product success.

Lastly, we secretly enjoy some schadenfreude when diving into the reasons why big organizations squander brilliant ideas.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #163: Building Agile Teams, Curiosity and Discovery, Squandering Brilliant Ideas

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Webinar #9: Sprint Review Anti-Patterns — November 6, 2018

TL;DR: Webinar Sprint Review Anti-Patterns

The ninth Hands-on Agile webinar sprint review anti-patterns addresses twelve anti-patterns of the sprint review—from death by PowerPoint to side-gigs to none of the stakeholders cares to attend.

Webinar Sprint Review Anti-Patterns — Hands-on Agile Webinar #9

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Food for Agile Thought #162: Organizational Agility, Enterprise Slowness, Product Strategy, State of DevOps Report 2018

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #162—shared with 19,373 peers—focuses on the problem of imposing agile practices top-down to achieve organizational agility, why enterprise organizations are so nerve-wreckingly slow, and why commitment cultures seem to produce better outcomes.

We then dive deep into product strategy. From how to be more strategic, to establishing an effective process, to running bets from a portfolio of innovation options.

Lastly, we applaud Puppet for providing the community with the 2018 edition of the State of DevOps report, now including a maturity model.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #162: Organizational Agility, Enterprise Slowness, Product Strategy, State of DevOps Report 2018

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Food for Agile Thought #161: Toyota Scrum, Lean vs. Agile vs. Design Thinking, XP Revisited, Sunk Cost Fallacy

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #161—shared with 19,269 peers—covers Toyota Scrum, a combination of the Toyota Production System and Scrum, we learn that Lean, Agile and Design Thinking absolutely make good partners, and how Ron Jeffries might express XP practices nowadays.

We then borrow leadership practices from winning sports teams for Scrum teams, we take five tips to heart to prevent product failures, and we gain new insight on how to de-risk the innovation process.

Lastly, we dive into a notorious decision making trap: the sunk cost fallacy.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #161: Toyota Scrum, Lean vs. Agile vs. Design Thinking, XP 2.0, Sunk Cost Fallacy

Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #161: Toyota Scrum, Lean vs. Agile vs. Design Thinking, XP Revisited, Sunk Cost Fallacy