Food for Agile Thought #230: XP w/ Kent Beck, Psychological Safety, Product Backlog Organization, Deliverables of Product Managers

TL; DR: Kent Beck, Psychological Safety—Food for Agile Thought #230

Welcome to the 230th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 25,326 peers. This week, we listen to Kent Beck, the XP creator; we get into the details of how agile leadership manifests itself, and we follow Dave Snowden analyzing a three-part-question popularized by Liberating Structures.

We also delve into the top ten deliverables of product managers; we embrace new ways of organizing our Product Backlogs, and we enjoy the deep-dive into the benefits of the north star framework.

Lastly, we ask what ‘psychological safety’ actually means in practice.

Did you miss last week’s Food for Agile Thought’s issue #229?

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Food for Agile Thought #229: Traumatic Agile, Measuring Transformations, Experiments at Pinterest, Absurd Design Sprints

TL; DR: Traumatic Agile, Absurd Design Sprints—Food for Agile Thought #229

Welcome to the 229th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 25,103 peers. This week, we ask whether ‘Agile’ is a reactionary movement; we delve into suitable metrics for experiments, and we learn from a bank how to become agile with 20-plus teams.

We also learn how Pinterest keeps ideas for experiments coming. Speaking of which, we gain insight into suitable experiments at Slack, and we reconsider the usefulness of Design Sprints.

Lastly, we finally have a reference to answer the obvious question: Does Google use Scrum?

Did you miss last week’s Food for Agile Thought’s issue #228?

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Food for Agile Thought #228: Asking Good Questions, Product Catastrophes, Agile’s Cognitive Science, Trade-offs & Debts

TL; DR: Asking Good Questions, Trade-offs & Debts—Food for Agile Thought #228

Welcome to the 228th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 25,103 peers. This week, we delve into asking good questions, thus overcoming assumptions; we learn more about the cognitive science behind ‘Agile,’ and we cautiously check SAFe again.

We gain insight into how to handle product failures catastrophes; we reflect whether trade-offs are worth the costs. Also, we come back to defining what a product is, focusing on its two critical elements.

Lastly, we appreciate an excursion into psychological safety—from its origins to pioneering its application.

Did you miss last week’s Food for Agile Thought’s issue #226?

Food for Agile Thought #228: Asking Good Questions, Agile’s Cognitive Science, Product Catastrophes, Trade-offs & Debts

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Food for Agile Thought #227: Agile Core Beliefs, Psychology of Feature Adoption, Agile Coaching Competencies, Design’s Unsexy Middle Bits

TL; DR: Agile Core Beliefs, Psychology of Feature Adoption—Food for Agile Thought #227

Welcome to the 227th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 25,021 peers. This week, we address agile core beliefs; we embrace the idea of a one-day Sprint, and we come back to agile coaching competencies.

We also learn how to move on as a product team, struggling with becoming data-informed; we explore cognitive biases in the adoption progress of new features, and we figure out how to speed up A/b tests without sacrificing accuracy.

Lastly, we appreciate the notion that we are not all designers—despite stickies, sharpie, and prototyping apps.

Did you miss last week’s Food for Agile Thought’s issue #226?

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Food for Agile Thought #226: Agile Coaching, Swarming, Backlog Bankruptcy, PM Sanity Test

TL; DR: Agile Coaching, Swarming—Food for Agile Thought #226

Welcome to the 226th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 24,842 peers. This week, we address the state of agile coaching; we learn more about swarming for teams, and we go back in time to the origins of Scrum.

We also come back to the pitfalls of achieving product/market-fit; we declare backlog bankruptcy, and we check a mental model to assess whether a group of product managers is capable of handling their job.

Lastly, we embrace some unique cognitive human traits that will distinguish us from machines for all eternity. Hopefully.

Did you miss last week’s Food for Agile Thought’s issue #225?

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Food for Agile Thought #225: Pair Programming, Probabilistic Forecasting, HiPPO Training, Idea Generation 3.0

TL; DR: Probabilistic Forecasting, HiPPO Training—Food for Agile Thought #225

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #225—shared with 24,837 peers—addresses the importance of pair programming; we seek to excel at predicting the future with probabilistic forecasting, and we appreciate an outsight view on Scrum by following sticky notes.

We also point at a crucial stakeholder management competence of Product Owners and Scrum Masters; we enjoy new games and exercises for ideation purposes, and we consider making our product worse for the sake of improving it.

Lastly, we embrace the coining of decaf resistance—it is good to know that a habitual behavior in so many organizations now has a name.

Did you miss last week’s Food for Agile Thought’s issue #224?

Food for Agile Thought #225: Pair Programming, Probabilistic Forecasting, HiPPO Training, Idea Generation 3.0 — Age-of-Product.com

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