Food for Agile Thought #270: Productive Uncertainty, Conway’s Law and Org Design for Success, Agile’s Intangibles, WSJF Prioritization

TL; DR: Agile’s Intangibles, Productive Uncertainty — Food for Agile Thought #270

Welcome to the 270th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 28,431 peers. This week, we cover Agile’s intangibles; we delve into innovation, risk mitigation, and creating value, and we analyze prerequisites of successful agile transformations at an organizational level.

We then learn about a developer’s perspective on what it takes to build a successful product development team. Also, we explore a handy tool for ordering Product Backlogs beyond the usual suspects like Cost of Delay, Kano model, or RICE, and we ask: “What else about product [management] is as ‘simple as it sounds’ but needs to be learned? Why do we fall into these traps?”

📺 Lastly, the recording of the 28th Hands-on Agile meetup on the Scrum Guide 2020’s eight remarkable changes is available.

Food for Agile Thought #270: Productive Uncertainty, Conway’s Law and Org Design for Success, Agile’s Intangibles, WSJF Prioritization — Age-of-Product.com
Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #270: Productive Uncertainty, Conway’s Law and Org Design for Success, Agile’s Intangibles, WSJF Prioritization

Food for Agile Thought #269: Estimating Cost of Delay, Re-Teaming, Measuring Real Progress, Is Your C-Level Getting Scrum?

TL; DR: Estimating Cost of Delay, Re-Teaming — Food for Agile Thought #269

Welcome to the 269th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 28,267 peers. This week, we delve into estimating Cost of Delay; we identify nine signs that your CEO understands Scrum, and we learn that mental models impact the efficiency and accuracy in decision-making.

We then enjoy the essence of product leadership from a new Marty Cagan book; we get into measuring real progress as a product team, and we embrace the canary product launch approach to test the waters with a restricted set of clients.

Lastly, we applaud Ken & Jeff for releasing the new Scrum Guide 2020.

Food for Agile Thought #269: Estimating Cost of Delay, Re-Teaming, Measuring Real Progress, Is Your C-Level Getting Scrum? — Age-of-Product.com
Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #269: Estimating Cost of Delay, Re-Teaming, Measuring Real Progress, Is Your C-Level Getting Scrum?

Food for Agile Thought #268: Decision Making, Technical Debt Explained, Stages of Innovation, Product Validation in the Field

TL; DR: Decision Making, Technical Debt Explained — Food for Agile Thought #268

Welcome to the 268th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 28,041 peers. This week, we delve into the dirty secrets of decision making; we refresh our memory regarding eight agile estimation practices, and we take appreciation beyond the usual Kudo cards.

We then welcome eleven lessons on how to escape the build trap; we come back Lean’s four phases of a product’s lifecycle, and we learn more about the results of evaluating an app in a real-life context.

Lastly, we embrace another approach to understanding technical debt.

Food for Agile Thought #268: Decision Making, Technical Debt Explained, Stages of Innovation, Product Validation in the Field — Age-of-Product.com
Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #268: Decision Making, Technical Debt Explained, Stages of Innovation, Product Validation in the Field

Food for Agile Thought #267: Psychopaths and Narcissists, Get Your Brain Back, Paradoxes of Product Management, Experiment Pitfalls

TL; DR: Psychopaths and Narcissists, Get Your Brain Back — Food for Agile Thought #267

Welcome to the 267th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 27,937 peers. This week, we learn how to deal with psychopaths and narcissists as a change agent; we move away from command & control to bring back creativity, and we figure out how agile contracting with customers works at an agency.

We then address eighteen product management paradoxes; we learn about eight avoidable mistakes when running experiments, and we get an overview of the results of a recent survey on OKRs and how organizations apply them in practice.

Lastly, we enjoy listening to Mary and Tom Poppendieck, sharing their thoughts on Lean as “a way of thinking that values people.”

Food for Agile Thought #267: Psychopaths and Narcissists, Get Your Brain Back, Paradoxes of Product Management, Experiment Pitfalls — Age-of-Product.com
Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #267: Psychopaths and Narcissists, Get Your Brain Back, Paradoxes of Product Management, Experiment Pitfalls

Food for Agile Thought #266: Popular Component Teams, Team Morale in WFH Times, Roadmaps Are Dead, Experimentation at Spotify

TL; DR: Popular Component Teams, Team Morale in WFH Times — Food for Agile Thought #266

Welcome to the 266th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 27,841 peers. This week, we attempt to understand the why and how of popular component teams; we choose new practices to build team morale remotely, and we confront our anxiety of having to deal with emotional reactions at work.

We then mourn the passing of product roadmaps (just kidding, they’re alive and well); we have a look at Spotify’s new platform supporting product discovery, and we gain a better understanding of how to determine the pricing of a SaaS product.

Lastly, we enjoy reading another free chapter of “The Art of Agile Development, Second Edition.”

Food for Agile Thought #266: Popular Component Teams, Team Morale in WFH Times, Roadmaps Are Dead, Experimentation at Spotify — Age-of-Product.com
Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #266: Popular Component Teams, Team Morale in WFH Times, Roadmaps Are Dead, Experimentation at Spotify

Food for Agile Thought #265: Predictability, Team Alignment & Self-Organization, Futures Wheel Planning, Alternative Futures Analysis

TL; DR: Predictability, Team Alignment — Food for Agile Thought #265

Welcome to the 265th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 27,728 peers. This week, we delve into why large organizations undertake agile transitions; it’s predictability, stupid! We also embrace the importance of team alignment, and we apply the concept of critical core components to self-organization.

We then come back to (strategic) planning with two helpful tools: the Futures Wheel and the ‘alternative futures analysis.’ Also, we support the idea that our main objective should be solving problems instead of focusing on adhering to previously defined processes if those distract from the solutions.

Lastly, we applaud Dolly Chugh for pointing at 15 ways to make our virtual meetings better and more inclusive.

Food for Agile Thought #265: Predictability, Team Alignment & Self-Organization, Futures Wheel Planning, Alternative Futures Analysis — Age-of-Product.com
Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #265: Predictability, Team Alignment & Self-Organization, Futures Wheel Planning, Alternative Futures Analysis