Food for Agile Thought #250: JTBD Guide, Good Retrospectives, Opportunity Mapping, Always Feature Teams, Right?

TL; DR: JTBD Guide, Good Retrospectives — Food for Agile Thought #250

Welcome to the 250th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 26,776 peers. This week, we appreciate a comprehensive JTBD guide with templates; we learn how to figure out whether a team is capable of having meaningful Retrospectives, and we reconsider our inclination to favor feature teams over component teams.

We then delve into opportunity mapping to improve our product work; we embrace the idea that we are probably not charging enough and that we should run some pricing experiments, and we explore the timing and the dynamic of innovation.

Lastly, we learn more about OKR throughout the different stages of product development work.

Food for Agile Thought #250: JTBD Guide, Good Retrospectives, Opportunity Mapping, Always Feature Teams, Right? — Age-of-Product.com

Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #250: JTBD Guide, Good Retrospectives, Opportunity Mapping, Always Feature Teams, Right?

Food for Agile Thought #249: Ruinous Scrum, Losing Out to SAFe, Sarah Cooper’s Product Discovery, Lying to Customers

TL; DR: Ruinous Scrum, Losing Out to SAFe — Food for Agile Thought #249

Welcome to the 249th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 26,763 peers. This week, we analyze the ruinous Scrum claim of some developers; we empathize with a failed attempt to avoid SAFe, and we learn about the success of an ambitious change project with Scrum.

We then delve into the journey of Sarah Cooper and her approach to product discovery as a comedian; we reassure our belief that lying to customers is unacceptable, and we analyze five critical success criteria of Design Thinking.

Lastly, we thank Bob Sutton for an interview on change and identifying pockets of excellence.

Food for Agile Thought #249: Ruinous Scrum, Losing Out to SAFe, Sarah Cooper’s Product Discovery, Lying to Customers — Age-of-Product.com

Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #249: Ruinous Scrum, Losing Out to SAFe, Sarah Cooper’s Product Discovery, Lying to Customers

Food for Agile Thought #248: Large Scale Agility, Silos & Politics, Beyond Product-Market Fit, The Art of Innovation

TL; DR: Large Scale Agility, Silos & Politics — Food for Agile Thought #248

Welcome to the 248th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 26,751 peers. This week, we learn to assess agile coaches regarding their competence for large scale agility; we integrate chaos into the organization, and we have a look at 32 Jira competitors.

We then come back to product work beyond the product-market fit threshold; we learn how to use cohort analysis to forecast revenue, and we listen to the maestro of innovation: Is it an art form or a craft?

Lastly, we are grateful for Ryan Dawson and Laura Edwards shedding some light on an unpleasant topic: silos, local optimization, and politics.

Food for Agile Thought #248: Large Scale Agility, Silos & Politics, Beyond Product-Market Fit, The Art of Innovation — Age-of-Product.com

Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #248: Large Scale Agility, Silos & Politics, Beyond Product-Market Fit, The Art of Innovation

Food for Agile Thought #247: Agile 101, Inspecting and Adapting Agility, Influence w/o Authority, Prototype vs. MVP

TL; DR: Agile 101, Inspecting and Adapting Agility — Food for Agile Thought #247

Welcome to the 247th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 26,724 peers. This week, we unearth a great introductory video for stakeholders, the Agile 101. In the light of the pandemic, we inspect and adapt the principles of agile management, and we learn about the importance of no longer giving in to a need: tell people what to do or hand them solutions.

We also think about how to influence others without having any real authority, a handy trick for every product mensch. We try to understand why some people can regularly create product success and follow the difference between an MVP and a prototype.

Lastly, we thank Hugo Bowne-Anderson for pointing at something not immediately obvious: an adverse outcome doesn’t mean a wrong decision.

Food for Agile Thought #247: Agile 101, Inspecting and Adapting Agility, Influence w/o Authority, Prototype vs MVP — Age-of-Product.com

Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #247: Agile 101, Inspecting and Adapting Agility, Influence w/o Authority, Prototype vs. MVP

Food for Agile Thought #246: Reliable Predictions, Well-Done Product Discovery, Psychological Safety Framework, Good Retention

TL; DR: Reliable Predictions, Well-Done Discovery — Food for Agile Thought #246

Welcome to the 246th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 26,711 peers. This week, we dissect reliable predictions; we explore a new Retrospective template to analyze year-long projects, and we warm up to the idea that visual thinking makes us better coaches.

We then learn how to measure and guide our product discovery efforts; we stop believing that prioritization needs to be based on value, and we get our hands on customer-retention statistics.

Lastly, we are grateful for a new framework that makes psychological safety in the workplace more tangible.

Food for Agile Thought #246: Reliable Predictions, Well-Done Product Discovery, Psychological Safety Framework, Good Retention — Age-of-Product.com

Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #246: Reliable Predictions, Well-Done Product Discovery, Psychological Safety Framework, Good Retention

Food for Agile Thought #245: Agile Well-Done, Fired by an Agile Team, Herding Stakeholders, Anxiety-Driven Product Development

TL; DR: Agile Well-Done, Fired by an Agile Team — Food for Agile Thought #245

Welcome to the 245th edition of the Food for Agile Thought newsletter, shared with 26,683 peers. This week, we learn about eight signs that indicate Agile well-done and how to organize a Gemba walk. Moreover, we also ask: can self-organizing teams fire teammates themselves?

We then delve into stakeholder alignment as well as eight ways to get your Product Backlog into shape without looking like an Excel sheet. We also discover hidden fears that might drive product management sub-consciously more that we want to admit.

Lastly, we come back once more to critical components of an agile friendly culture.

Food for Agile Thought #245: Agile Well-Done, Fired by an Agile Team, Herding Stakeholders, Anxiety-Driven Product Development - Age-of-Product.com

Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #245: Agile Well-Done, Fired by an Agile Team, Herding Stakeholders, Anxiety-Driven Product Development