Food for Agile Thought #121: Agile Manifesto History, Scrum Master Anti-Patterns, Lean Scrum, Sociocracy

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #121—shared with 13,152 peers—travels back in time, illuminating the Agile Manifesto history. We learn how Scrum and Lean UX complement each other, and why software development frameworks could be labeled ‘collective fiction.’

We also improve our understanding of learning organizations and how Sociocracy 3.0 contributes to their creation. Hiten Shah shares five mental models that help grow a product, and Mind the Product makes a compelling offer to binge-watch product talks.

Lastly, I published the last post from the Scrum anti-patterns series; there are now 160-plus of them. This article addresses the majority of the readers of this newsletter: Scrum Masters.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #121: Agile Manifesto History, Scrum Master Anti-Patterns, Lean Scrum, Sociocracy

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Food for Agile Thought #120: Agile Trends, Throughput, High-Performance Teams and Organizations

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #120—shared with 12,993 peers—focuses on agile trends as we have a look at the latest edition of ThoughtWork’s Tech Radar as well as at the domains of business agility in the 21. Century.

We also point at suitable agile metrics beyond velocity and at moments that reveal you’re a lucky member of a high-performing team.

Lastly, we learn how to apply product management principles to internal products, and how to make the best out of customer feedback.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #120: Agile Trends, Throughput, High-Performance Teams and Organizations

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Food for Agile Thought #119: Business Agility, Agile Career Lessons, Product Design by Committee

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #119—shared with 12,907 peers—addresses the decision process in groups, how XScale’s business agility approach works, and why cargo cult agile usually means running in circles.

We share a handy guide on how to deal with engineering teams, and why you need to include them in any persona creation activity. We also have a look at Buffer’s 6-week product cycle.

Lastly, we cover why product management by committee is doomed from the start, and we learn about how hard it is as a corporation to get from a big idea to a sustainable product.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #119: Business Agility, Agile Career Lessons, Product Design by Committee

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Food for Agile Thought #118: Scrum Troubles, Brilliant Jerks, How to Experiment, Sprint Review for POs

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #118—shared with 12,812 peers—addresses the not so apparent Scrum troubles: it is hard, expensive and utterly useless if implemented half-heartedly.

Jeff Patton explains a range of human flaws and failures during product discovery, which is the reason that AirBnB runs experiments diligently—learn from Jan how that works in detail.

Lastly, we cover once more the issue of brilliant engineers who also happen to be jerks, and the pointy-haired Boss finally reveals the purpose of predictions.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #118: Scrum Troubles, Brilliant Jerks, How to Experiment, Sprint Review for POs

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Food for Agile Thought #117: The Agile Periodic Table, Scrum Guide 2017, AMA W/ Steve Portigal

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #117—shared with 12,693 peers—covers the agile periodic table, a remarkable visualization of agile principles and practices. We also learn more about the background of the changes to the Scrum Guide leading to the 2017 edition.

In addition to that, we feature survey results that prove that being able to prioritize product features is the most important trait that defines your success as a product owner or product manager.

Lastly, the WhatUsersDo Community on Slack had a great session with tips & tricks from Steve Portigal on user testing. (By the way, the Hands-on Agile Slack community just crossed the 2000 member threshold, see below.)

Have a great week!

The Agile Periodic Table, Scrum Guide 2017, AMA W/ Steve Portigal — Food for Agile Thought #117

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Food for Agile Thought #116: Agile Experiments, Starting Standups on Time, Rebuilding Trust

Food for Agile Thought’s issue #116—shared with 12,576 peers—covers agile experiments, and how to free yourself from five failure anxieties when transitioning to agile.

We also learn how to motivate people to be on time (without playing Bob Marley), and how to rebuild trust in a product and engineering team.

Lastly, we learn from Julian Birkinshaw—Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at the London Business School—about Agile’s impact on strategy.

Have a great week!

Food for Agile Thought #116: Agile Experiments, Starting Standups on Time, Rebuilding Trust

Continue reading Food for Agile Thought #116: Agile Experiments, Starting Standups on Time, Rebuilding Trust