Cargo Cult Agile: The ‘State of Agile’ Checklist for Your Organization

TL;DR: The Cargo Cult Agile Checklist for Download

You want to know the state of agility in your organization? Here we go: Download the checklist, distribute it generously among your colleagues and run a quick poll. It will only take 5 minutes of their time–and then run an analysis on their feedback. If the average number of checkboxes marked is higher than nine, then you are probably practicing cargo cult agile. Consider changing it. Or abandon your agile experiment all together. But don’t refer to it as “agile” any longer.

Everyday Failures in Applying Agile

Agile methodologies, like Scrum, have been on the rise across organizations of all kind and sizes for some years by now. Many consultants responded to the increasing demand for agile practitioners, particularly from corporate organizations, with rebranding themselves.

Continue reading Cargo Cult Agile: The ‘State of Agile’ Checklist for Your Organization

Customer Care as a Litmus Test for Innovation and Agile Change

TL;DR: Customer Care as a Litmus Test for Innovation and Agile Change

Customer care as entity, its function and status within a company, can act as a good litmus test for a company’s culture, its product management, and thus its potential for innovation and agile change.

If customer care is regarded solely as a cost center that needs to be outsourced, agile change is unlikely to happen in that organization.

Continue reading Customer Care as a Litmus Test for Innovation and Agile Change

20 Questions a New Scrum Master Should Ask Her Team to Get up to Speed

20 questions for you — the new Scrum master — that fit into a 60 minutes time-box. Start learning how the new Scrum team is currently working and get up to speed. Download an easy printable template for your convenience.

Start Learning the Ropes in 60 Minutes

I was recently asked to participate in the product backlog grooming of a team that was looking for a new Scrum master. I was skeptical in the beginning. I had only limited knowledge about the project—a commercial website based on a CMS—, the grooming session was time-boxed to 60 minutes, and I hadn’t met the team members before beyond a very brief “hello”.

So, I prepared a questionnaire with topics I wanted to learn more about, and listened to the team grooming several user stories asking questions from the list when appropriate. Surprisingly, the insights turned out to be much more qualified than I expected. Particularly, the low-hanging (user story and Scrum improvement) fruits could be identified rather easily.

Continue reading 20 Questions a New Scrum Master Should Ask Her Team to Get up to Speed

App Prototyping with Absolute Beginners – Agile Experiments

TL;DR: App Prototyping with Absolute Beginners

Yes, even absolute beginners can prototype an app. And learn a lot about product management, product design and user experience along the way. It is a low-cost exercise that will significantly improve communication within your organization.

Continue reading App Prototyping with Absolute Beginners – Agile Experiments

Welcome to the Agile Clinic – Our New LinkedIn Group For Agile Change

Let’s Fix Agile

When I wrote the Agile Failure Patterns In Organizations post in October, I could not anticipate the feedback it would receive: Over 80 comments on the Hacker News thread and almost 15,000 readers on the blog and additional channels like DZone or Business2Community.

Continue reading Welcome to the Agile Clinic – Our New LinkedIn Group For Agile Change

Scrum: The Obsession with Commitment Matching Velocity

The Fine Line Between Risk Mitigation and Falling Back into Covering Your Butt

The team hasn’t met its commitments once. Not once.

The atmosphere was becoming thicker by the minute. The management was displeased with the progress of the project and was looking for answers, starring at a bunch of Jira charts, I prepared earlier. “How can we claim that we are working in Scrum mode, if the team is not sticking with the rules?”

Throughout the majority of projects I have been working on I could observe an obsession with burn-down charts and other Scrum metrics, mainly team commitments. And as a consequence, a side product of backlog grooming, estimation and sprint planning is elevated to the most important management indicator that “Agile” works: The team’s commitment is matching or outperforming its average velocity.

Continue reading Scrum: The Obsession with Commitment Matching Velocity